A&F Conversations: Sahil Shah, co-founder, FundTonic

You have so far known Art&Found as the place where you can find great contemporary art by Indian artists. However, we have secretly been building another exciting vertical which is doing up commercial spaces. Through conversations and research about the culture of the brand we are working with, we zoom in on a theme and then create a mix of art frames, wall murals and fabrication to give the space a character of its own. Our first adventure in this space was the co-working space in Mumbai, FundTonic. To take you behind the scenes of our collaboration, we speak to Sahil Shah, co-founder, FundTonic. Edited excerpts:

Could you tell our readers how did the collaboration between Art&Found and FundTonic come about to be?

When we started this co-working space, we wanted to completely avoid anything that’s mundane and regular. We wanted something truly inspiring, something that gives a young look to the entire place, and has a feel good factor. So I started looking around for a few options, during which a cousin of mine told me about Art&Found.

We started talking to them and they found the project interesting and challenging, and decided to take it up. They said that that between murals, paintings, frames and 3D art, they will conceptualize the whole space. Their ideas were completely in-sync  with what he had in mind so we went ahead with it.

When you started this process, did you have any overall theme or ambience in mind for the space?

When we described to Art&Found what we wanted, they presented two themes to us and we liked one of them. The theme was basically art that’s inspirational, vibrant, and also has a twist of sarcasm and humor in it. That struck a chord.

The energy of the place changes completely as soon as art becomes a part of it.


How was the placement process for the artworks? Did you face any particular challenges?

We didn’t have any challenges per se. However, there were some spaces where we had these massive walls and we were trying to figure out how to make those exciting. If we had just put frames there, it might have looked empty and if we had put 3D art there then it would have become quite expensive. So we had to find the balance between the  commercial and the art aspect of the whole thing. That’s where the design and lines were simplified and we found a middle ground with wall murals.

That brought vibrancy with colors, and it said something about the place. For example, in one of the lower floors, one entire wall is covered with this artwork of a guy swimming and there is this really nice motivational line that goes with that.

According to you, how does art in a space like yours truly influence/inspire the people who work there?   

Well, art is always a great influence. There is a very subconscious difference between a place with art and a place without art. The energy of the place changes completely as soon as art becomes a part of it. While obviously people notice and comment on the art when they walk in for the first time, but they kind of subconsciously feel good about it all the time. Art also dictates the culture of a place a lot. A place that doesn’t have art is instantly mundane and boring, and it is perceived as a serious corporate office. Art tells you that this is a fun and casual space, where you can be yourself.

Words by Payal Khandelwal

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